Articles | Volume 14, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 14, 539–548, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-539-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 539–548, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-539-2020

Research article 11 Feb 2020

Research article | 11 Feb 2020

Melt in Antarctica derived from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) observations at L band

Marion Leduc-Leballeur et al.

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Cited articles

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Al Bitar, A., Mialon, A., Kerr, Y. H., Cabot, F., Richaume, P., Jacquette, E., Quesney, A., Mahmoodi, A., Tarot, S., Parrens, M., Al-Yaari, A., Pellarin, T., Rodriguez-Fernandez, N., and Wigneron, J.-P.: The global SMOS Level 3 daily soil moisture and brightness temperature maps, Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 293–315, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-293-2017, 2017. a
Ashcraft, I. S. and Long, D. G.: Comparison of methods for melt detection over Greenland using active and passive microwave measurements, Int. J. Remote Sens., 27, 2469–2488, https://doi.org/10.1080/01431160500534465, 2006. a
Brodzik, M. J. and Knowles, K.: EASE-Grid 2.0 Land-Ocean-Coastline-Ice Masks Derived from Boston University MODIS/Terra Land Cover Data, Version 1, NASA National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center, Boulder, Colorado, USA, https://doi.org/10.5067/VY2JQZL9J8AQ, 2011. a
Brodzik, M. J., Billingsley, B., Haran, T., Raup, B., and Savoie, M. H.: EASE-grid 2.0: Incremental but Significant Improvements for Earth-Gridded Data Sets, ISPRS Int. Geo-Inf., 1, 32–45, https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi1010032, 2012. a
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To study the coast and ice shelves affected by melt in Antarctica during the austral summer, we exploited the 1.4 GHz radiometric satellite observations. We showed that this frequency provides additional information on melt occurrence and on the location of the water in the snowpack compared to the 19 GHz observations. This opens an avenue for improving the melting season monitoring with a combination of both frequencies and exploring the possibility of deep-water detection in the snowpack.