Articles | Volume 13, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 13, 795–814, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-795-2019
The Cryosphere, 13, 795–814, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-795-2019
Research article
05 Mar 2019
Research article | 05 Mar 2019

Extracting recent short-term glacier velocity evolution over southern Alaska and the Yukon from a large collection of Landsat data

Bas Altena et al.

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Cited articles

Abe, T. and Furuya, M.: Winter speed-up of quiescent surge-type glaciers in Yukon, Canada, The Cryosphere, 9, 1183–1190, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-1183-2015, 2015. a, b
Abe, T., Furuya, M., and Sakakibara, D.: Brief Communication: Twelve-year cyclic surging episodes at Donjek Glacier in Yukon, Canada, The Cryosphere, 10, 1427–1432, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-1427-2016, 2016. a, b
Altena, B. and Kääb, A.: Elevation change and improved velocity retrieval using orthorectified optical satellite data from different orbits, Remote Sensing, 9, 300, https://doi.org/10.3390/rs9030300, 2017a. a, b, c, d, e
Altena, B. and Kääb, A.: Weekly glacier flow estimation from dense satellite time series using adapted optical flow technology, Front. Earth Sci., 5, 53 pp., https://doi.org/10.3389/feart.2017.00053, 2017b. a
Arendt, A., Luthcke, S., Gardner, A., O'neel, S., Hill, D., Moholdt, G., and Abdalati, W.: Analysis of a GRACE global mascon solution for Gulf of Alaska glaciers, J. Glaciol., 59, 913–924, https://doi.org/10.3189/2013JoG12J197, 2013. a
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Short summary
Many glaciers in southern Alaska and the Yukon experience changes in flow speed, which occur in episodes or sporadically. These flow changes can be measured with satellites, but the resulting raw velocity products are messy. Thus in this study we developed an automatic method to produce a synthesized velocity product over a large glacier region of roughly 600 km by 200 km. Velocities are at a monthly resolution and at 300 m resolution, making all kinds of glacier dynamics observable.