Articles | Volume 13, issue 11
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-3155-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-3155-2019
Research article
 | 
28 Nov 2019
Research article |  | 28 Nov 2019

Geochemical signatures of pingo ice and its origin in Grøndalen, west Spitsbergen

Nikita Demidov, Sebastian Wetterich, Sergey Verkulich, Aleksey Ekaykin, Hanno Meyer, Mikhail Anisimov, Lutz Schirrmeister, Vasily Demidov, and Andrew J. Hodson

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Cited articles

Burr, D. M., Tanaka, K. L., and Yoshikawa, K.: Pingos on Earth and Mars, Planet. Space Sci., 57, 541–555, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2008.11.003, 2009. 
Chernov, R. A. and Muraviev, A. Ya.: Contemporary changes in the area of glaciers in the western part of the Nordenskjold Land (Svalbard), Ice and Snow, 58, 462–472, https://doi.org/10.15356/2076-6734-2018-4-462-472, 2018 (in Russian). 
Chizhova, Ju. N. and Vasil'chuk, Yu. K.: Use of stable water isotopes to identify stages of the pingo ice core formation, Ice and Snow, 58, 507–523, https://doi.org/10.15356/2076-6734-2018-4-507-523, 2018 (in Russian). 
Christiansen, H. H., Gilbert, G. L., Demidov, N., Guglielmin, M., Isaksen, K., Osuch, M., and Boike, J.: Permafrost thermal snapshot and active-layer thickness in Svalbard 2016–2017, in: SESS report 2018, The State of Environmental Science in Svalbard – an annual report, edited by: Orr, E., Hansen, G., Lappalainen, H., Hübner, C., and Lihavainen, H., SIOS, Longyearbyen, Svalbard, 26–47, available at: https://www.sios-svalbard.org/sites/sios-svalbard.org/files/common/SESSreport_2018_FullReport.pdf, last access: 1 April 2019. 
Dansgaard, W.: Stable isotopes in precipitation, Tellus, 16, 436–468, https://doi.org/10.3402/tellusa.v16i4.8993, 1964. 
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Short summary
As Norwegian geologist Liestøl (1996) recognised, in connection with formation of pingos there are a great many unsolved questions. Drillings and temperature measurements through the pingo mound and also through the surrounding permafrost are needed before the problems can be better understood. To shed light on pingo formation here we present the results of first drilling of pingo on Spitsbergen together with results of detailed hydrochemical and stable-isotope studies of massive-ice samples.