Articles | Volume 13, issue 7
The Cryosphere, 13, 2051–2073, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2051-2019
The Cryosphere, 13, 2051–2073, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2051-2019
Research article
29 Jul 2019
Research article | 29 Jul 2019

The 2018 North Greenland polynya observed by a newly introduced merged optical and passive microwave sea-ice concentration dataset

Valentin Ludwig et al.

Related authors

Reviews and syntheses: A framework to observe, understand, and project ecosystem response to environmental change in the East Antarctic Southern Ocean
Julian Gutt, Stefanie Arndt, David Keith Alan Barnes, Horst Bornemann, Thomas Brey, Olaf Eisen, Hauke Flores, Huw Griffiths, Christian Haas, Stefan Hain, Tore Hattermann, Christoph Held, Mario Hoppema, Enrique Isla, Markus Janout, Céline Le Bohec, Heike Link, Felix Christopher Mark, Sebastien Moreau, Scarlett Trimborn, Ilse van Opzeeland, Hans-Otto Pörtner, Fokje Schaafsma, Katharina Teschke, Sandra Tippenhauer, Anton Van de Putte, Mia Wege, Daniel Zitterbart, and Dieter Piepenburg
Biogeosciences Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2022-110,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2022-110, 2022
Preprint under review for BG
Short summary
The sensitivity of landfast sea ice to atmospheric forcing in single-column model simulations: a case study at Zhongshan Station, Antarctica
Fengguan Gu, Qinghua Yang, Frank Kauker, Changwei Liu, Guanghua Hao, Chao-Yuan Yang, Jiping Liu, Petra Heil, Xuewei Li, and Bo Han
The Cryosphere, 16, 1873–1887, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1873-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1873-2022, 2022
Short summary
Sea ice classification of TerraSAR-X ScanSAR images for the MOSAiC expedition incorporating per-class incidence angle dependency of image texture
Wenkai Guo, Polona Itkin, Suman Singha, Anthony Paul Doulgeris, Malin Johansson, and Gunnar Spreen
The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-86,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-86, 2022
Preprint under review for TC
Short summary
Arctic sea ice anomalies during the MOSAiC winter 2019/20
Klaus Dethloff, Wieslaw Maslowski, Stefan Hendricks, Younjoo J. Lee, Helge F. Goessling, Thomas Krumpen, Christian Haas, Dörthe Handorf, Robert Ricker, Vladimir Bessonov, John J. Cassano, Jaclyn Clement Kinney, Robert Osinski, Markus Rex, Annette Rinke, Julia Sokolova, and Anja Sommerfeld
The Cryosphere, 16, 981–1005, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-981-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-981-2022, 2022
Short summary
Weddell Sea polynya analysis using SMOS–SMAP apparent sea ice thickness retrieval
Alexander Mchedlishvili, Gunnar Spreen, Christian Melsheimer, and Marcus Huntemann
The Cryosphere, 16, 471–487, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-471-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-471-2022, 2022
Short summary

Related subject area

Discipline: Sea ice | Subject: Remote Sensing
Characterizing the sea-ice floe size distribution in the Canada Basin from high-resolution optical satellite imagery
Alexis Anne Denton and Mary-Louise Timmermans
The Cryosphere, 16, 1563–1578, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1563-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1563-2022, 2022
Short summary
Generating large-scale sea ice motion from Sentinel-1 and the RADARSAT Constellation Mission using the Environment and Climate Change Canada automated sea ice tracking system
Stephen E. L. Howell, Mike Brady, and Alexander S. Komarov
The Cryosphere, 16, 1125–1139, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1125-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1125-2022, 2022
Short summary
Rotational drift in Antarctic sea ice: pronounced cyclonic features and differences between data products
Wayne de Jager and Marcello Vichi
The Cryosphere, 16, 925–940, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-925-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-925-2022, 2022
Short summary
Satellite passive microwave sea-ice concentration data set intercomparison using Landsat data
Stefan Kern, Thomas Lavergne, Leif Toudal Pedersen, Rasmus Tage Tonboe, Louisa Bell, Maybritt Meyer, and Luise Zeigermann
The Cryosphere, 16, 349–378, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-349-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-349-2022, 2022
Short summary
Cross-platform classification of level and deformed sea ice considering per-class incident angle dependency of backscatter intensity
Wenkai Guo, Polona Itkin, Johannes Lohse, Malin Johansson, and Anthony Paul Doulgeris
The Cryosphere, 16, 237–257, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-237-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-237-2022, 2022
Short summary

Cited articles

Ackerman, S., Frey, R., Strabala, K., Liu, Y., Gumley, L., Baum, B., and Menzel, P.: MODIS Atmosphere L2 Cloud Mask Product. NASA MODIS Adaptive Processing System, Goddard Space Flight Center, USA, https://doi.org/10.5067/MODIS/MOD35_L2.061, 2017. a
Beitsch, A., Kaleschke, L., and Kern, S.: Investigating High-Resolution AMSR2 Sea Ice Concentrations during the February 2013 Fracture Event in the Beaufort Sea, Remote Sensing, 6, 3841–3856, https://doi.org/10.3390/rs6053841, 2014. a
Castro-Morales, K., Kauker, F., Losch, M., Hendricks, S., Riemann-Campe, K., and Gerdes, R.: Sensitivity of simulated Arctic sea ice to realistic ice thickness distributions and snow parameterizations, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 119, 559–571, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013JC009342, 2014. a
Copernicus Climate Change Service: (C3S): ERA5: Fifth generation of ECMWF atmospheric reanalyses of the global climate. Copernicus Climate Change Service Climate Data Store (CDS), available at: https://archive.org/details/nasa_techdoc_19960016967 (last access: 29 July 2019), 2017. a
Comiso, J. C.: SSM/I sea ice concentrations using the bootstrap algorithm, vol. 1380, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland, 1995. a
Download
Short summary
Sea-ice concentration, the fraction of an area covered by sea ice, can be observed from satellites with different methods. We combine two methods to obtain a product which is better than either of the input measurements alone. The benefit of our product is demonstrated by observing the formation of an open water area which can now be observed with more detail. Additionally, we find that the open water area formed because the sea ice drifted in the opposite direction and faster than usual.