Articles | Volume 16, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 16, 1107–1123, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1107-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 1107–1123, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1107-2022
Research article
31 Mar 2022
Research article | 31 Mar 2022

Contribution of warm and moist atmospheric flow to a record minimum July sea ice extent of the Arctic in 2020

Yu Liang et al.

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Short summary
A record minimum July sea ice extent, since 1979, was observed in 2020. Our results reveal that an anomalously high advection of energy and water vapor prevailed during spring (April to June) 2020 over regions with noticeable sea ice retreat. The large-scale atmospheric circulation and cyclones act in concert to trigger the exceptionally warm and moist flow. The convergence of the transport changed the atmospheric characteristics and the surface energy budget, thus causing a severe sea ice melt.