Articles | Volume 13, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 13, 1167–1186, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1167-2019
The Cryosphere, 13, 1167–1186, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1167-2019

Research article 09 Apr 2019

Research article | 09 Apr 2019

Simulating intersection angles between conjugate faults in sea ice with different viscous–plastic rheologies

Damien Ringeisen et al.

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Cited articles

Aksenov, Y. and Hibler, W. D.: Failure Propagation Effects in an Anisotropic Sea Ice Dynamics Model, in: IUTAM Symposium on Scaling Laws in Ice Mechanics and Ice Dynamics, edited by: Dempsey, J. P. and Shen, H. H., Solid Mechanics and Its Applications, 363–372, UTAM Symposium, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, 13–16 June 2000, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001. a
Babić, M., Shen, H. H., and Shen, H. T.: The stress tensor in granular shear flows of uniform, deformable disks at high solids concentrations, J. Fluid Mech., 219, 81–118, https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022112090002877, 1990. a
Balendran, B. and Nemat-Nasser, S.: Double sliding model for cyclic deformation of granular materials, including dilatancy effects, J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 41, 573–612, https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-5096(93)90049-L, 1993. a, b
Bouchat, A. and Tremblay, B.: Energy dissipation in viscous-plastic sea-ice models, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 119, 976–994, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013JC009436, 2014. a
Bouchat, A. and Tremblay, B.: Using sea-ice deformation fields to constrain the mechanical strength parameters of geophysical sea ice, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 122, 5802–5825, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JC013020, 2017. a, b, c, d, e
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We study the creation of fracture in sea ice plastic models. To do this, we compress an ideal piece of ice of 8 km by 25 km. We use two different mathematical expressions defining the resistance of ice. We find that the most common one is unable to model the fracture correctly, while the other gives better results but brings instabilities. The results are often in opposition with ice granular nature (e.g., sand) and call for changes in ice modeling.