Articles | Volume 15, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 15, 677–694, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-677-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 677–694, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-677-2021
Research article
12 Feb 2021
Research article | 12 Feb 2021

Crystallographic analysis of temperate ice on Rhonegletscher, Swiss Alps

Sebastian Hellmann et al.

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We analyse the orientation of ice crystals in an Alpine glacier and compare this orientation with the ice flow direction. We found that the crystals orient in the direction of the largest stress which is in the flow direction in the upper parts of the glacier and in the vertical direction for deeper zones of the glacier. The grains cluster around this maximum stress direction, in particular four-point maxima, most likely as a result of recrystallisation under relatively warm conditions.