Articles | Volume 16, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 16, 297–314, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-297-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 297–314, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-297-2022
Research article
25 Jan 2022
Research article | 25 Jan 2022

Dam type and lake location characterize ice-marginal lake area change in Alaska and NW Canada between 1984 and 2019

Brianna Rick et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Glacial lakes impact societies as both resources and hazards. Lakes form, grow, and drain as glaciers thin and retreat, and understanding lake evolution is a critical first step in assessing their hazard potential. We map glacial lakes in Alaska between 1984 and 2019. Overall, lakes grew in number and area, though lakes with different damming material (ice, moraine, bedrock) behaved differently. Namely, ice-dammed lakes decreased in number and area, a trend lost if dam type is not considered.