Articles | Volume 15, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 15, 547–570, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-547-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 547–570, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-547-2021

Research article 08 Feb 2021

Research article | 08 Feb 2021

Annual and inter-annual variability and trends of albedo of Icelandic glaciers

Andri Gunnarsson et al.

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Cited articles

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Surface albedo quantifies the fraction of the sunlight reflected by the surface of the Earth. During the melt season in the Northern Hemisphere solar energy absorbed by snow- and ice-covered surfaces is mainly controlled by surface albedo. For Icelandic glaciers, air temperature and surface albedo are the dominating factors governing annual variability of glacier surface melt. Satellite data from the MODIS sensor are used to create a data set spanning the glacier melt season.