Articles | Volume 14, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 14, 1937–1950, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1937-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 1937–1950, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1937-2020

Research article 15 Jun 2020

Research article | 15 Jun 2020

Opportunistic evaluation of modelled sea ice drift using passively drifting telemetry collars in Hudson Bay, Canada

Ron R. Togunov et al.

Related subject area

Discipline: Sea ice | Subject: Remote Sensing
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Cited articles

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Short summary
Sea ice drift affects important geophysical and biological processes in the Arctic. Using the motion of dropped polar bear GPS collars, our study evaluated the accuracy of a popular satellite-based ice drift model in Hudson Bay. We observed that velocity was underestimated, particularly at higher speeds. Direction was unbiased, but it was less precise at lower speeds. These biases should be accounted for in climate and ecological research relying on accurate/absolute drift velocities.