Articles | Volume 15, issue 12
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5281-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5281-2021
Research article
 | 
30 Nov 2021
Research article |  | 30 Nov 2021

Improved ELMv1-ECA simulations of zero-curtain periods and cold-season CH4 and CO2 emissions at Alaskan Arctic tundra sites

Jing Tao, Qing Zhu, William J. Riley, and Rebecca B. Neumann

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Cited articles

Anthony, K. M. W., Anthony, P., Grosse, G., and Chanton, J.: Geologic methane seeps along boundaries of Arctic permafrost thaw and melting glaciers, Nat. Geosci., 5, 419–426, 2012. 
Arndt, K. A., Oechel, W. C., Goodrich, J. P., Bailey, B. A., Kalhori, A., Hashemi, J., Sweeney, C., and Zona, D.: Sensitivity of Methane Emissions to Later Soil Freezing in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, J. Geophys. Res.-Biogeo., 124, 2595–2609, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JG005242, 2019. 
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Bisht, G., Riley, W. J., Wainwright, H. M., Dafflon, B., Yuan, F., and Romanovsky, V. E.: Impacts of microtopographic snow redistribution and lateral subsurface processes on hydrologic and thermal states in an Arctic polygonal ground ecosystem: a case study using ELM-3D v1.0, Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 61–76, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-61-2018, 2018. 
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Short summary
We improved the DOE's E3SM land model (ELMv1-ECA) simulations of soil temperature, zero-curtain period durations, cold-season CH4, and CO2 emissions at several Alaskan Arctic tundra sites. We demonstrated that simulated CH4 emissions during zero-curtain periods accounted for more than 50 % of total emissions throughout the entire cold season (Sep to May). We also found that cold-season CO2 emissions largely offset warm-season net uptake currently and showed increasing trends from 1950 to 2017.