Articles | Volume 15, issue 12
The Cryosphere, 15, 5281–5307, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5281-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 5281–5307, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5281-2021

Research article 30 Nov 2021

Research article | 30 Nov 2021

Improved ELMv1-ECA simulations of zero-curtain periods and cold-season CH4 and CO2 emissions at Alaskan Arctic tundra sites

Jing Tao et al.

Data sets

ABoVE: CO2 and CH4 Fluxes and Meteorology at Flux Tower Sites, Alaska, 2015-2017 W. C. Oechel and A. Kalhori https://doi.org/10.3334/ornldaac/1562

CARVE-ARCSS: Methane Loss From Arctic- Fluxes From the Alaskan North Slope D. Zona, W. Oechel, C. E. Miller, S. J. Dinardo, R. Commane, J. O. W. Lindaas, R. Y.-W. Chang, S. C. Wofsy, C. Sweeney, and A. Karion https://doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1300

Updated ELMv1-ECA for improved simulations of soil zero-curtain periods and cold-season carbon emissions at tundra sites (ELMv1av1b) J. Tao, Q. Zhu, W. Riley, and R. Neuman https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5725525

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Short summary
We improved the DOE's E3SM land model (ELMv1-ECA) simulations of soil temperature, zero-curtain period durations, cold-season CH4, and CO2 emissions at several Alaskan Arctic tundra sites. We demonstrated that simulated CH4 emissions during zero-curtain periods accounted for more than 50 % of total emissions throughout the entire cold season (Sep to May). We also found that cold-season CO2 emissions largely offset warm-season net uptake currently and showed increasing trends from 1950 to 2017.