Articles | Volume 13, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 13, 943–954, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-943-2019
The Cryosphere, 13, 943–954, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-943-2019

Research article 19 Mar 2019

Research article | 19 Mar 2019

Evaluation of CloudSat snowfall rate profiles by a comparison with in situ micro-rain radar observations in East Antarctica

Florentin Lemonnier et al.

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Manuscript not accepted for further review
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Cited articles

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Short summary
Evaluation of the vertical precipitation rate profiles of CloudSat radar by comparison with two surface-based micro-rain radars (MRR) located at two antarctic stations gives a near-perfect correlation between both datasets, even though climatic and geographic conditions are different for the stations. A better understanding and reassessment of CloudSat uncertainties ranging from −13 % up to +22 % confirms the robustness of the CloudSat retrievals of snowfall over Antarctica.