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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 9, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 9, 229–243, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-229-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 9, 229–243, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-229-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 06 Feb 2015

Research article | 06 Feb 2015

Snow depth mapping in high-alpine catchments using digital photogrammetry

Y. Bühler et al.

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Cited articles

Aguilar, F. J. and Mills, J. P.: Accuracy assessment of lidar-derived digital elevation models, Photogramm. Record, 23, 148–169, 2008.
Bavay, M., Lehning, M., Jonas, T., and Löwe, H.: Simulations of future snow cover and discharge in Alpine headwater catchments, Hydrol. Process., 23, 95–108, 2009.
Bründl, M., Etter, H.-J., Steiniger, M., Klingler, Ch., Rhyner, J., and Ammann, W. J.: IFKIS – a basis for managing avalanche risk in settlements and on roads in Switzerland, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 4, 257–262, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-4-257-2004, 2004.
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Short summary
We are able to map snow depth over large areas ( > 100km2) using airborne digital photogrammetry. Digital photogrammetry is more economical than airborne Laser Scanning but slightly less accurate. Comparisons to independent snow depth measurements reveal an accuracy of about 30cm. Spatial continuous mapping of snow depth is a major step forward compared to point measurements usually applied today. Limitations are steep slopes (> 50°) and areas covered by trees and scrubs.
We are able to map snow depth over large areas ( 100km2) using airborne digital photogrammetry....
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