Articles | Volume 15, issue 7
The Cryosphere, 15, 3059–3081, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3059-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 3059–3081, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3059-2021

Research article 06 Jul 2021

Research article | 06 Jul 2021

Thaw-driven mass wasting couples slopes with downstream systems, and effects propagate through Arctic drainage networks

Steven V. Kokelj et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Feb 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Steve Kokelj on behalf of the Authors (28 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (15 Mar 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Steve Kokelj on behalf of the Authors (08 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (14 Apr 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Steve Kokelj on behalf of the Authors (30 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (14 May 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Steve Kokelj on behalf of the Authors (28 May 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Climate-driven landslides are transforming glacially conditioned permafrost terrain, coupling slopes with aquatic systems, and triggering a cascade of downstream effects. Nonlinear intensification of thawing slopes is primarily affecting headwater systems where slope sediment yields overwhelm stream transport capacity. The propagation of effects across watershed scales indicates that western Arctic Canada will be an interconnected hotspot of thaw-driven change through the coming millennia.