Articles | Volume 15, issue 7
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3059-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3059-2021
Research article
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06 Jul 2021
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 06 Jul 2021

Thaw-driven mass wasting couples slopes with downstream systems, and effects propagate through Arctic drainage networks

Steven V. Kokelj, Justin Kokoszka, Jurjen van der Sluijs, Ashley C. A. Rudy, Jon Tunnicliffe, Sarah Shakil, Suzanne E. Tank, and Scott Zolkos

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Latest update: 17 Jun 2024
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Short summary
Climate-driven landslides are transforming glacially conditioned permafrost terrain, coupling slopes with aquatic systems, and triggering a cascade of downstream effects. Nonlinear intensification of thawing slopes is primarily affecting headwater systems where slope sediment yields overwhelm stream transport capacity. The propagation of effects across watershed scales indicates that western Arctic Canada will be an interconnected hotspot of thaw-driven change through the coming millennia.