Articles | Volume 14, issue 8
The Cryosphere, 14, 2715–2727, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2715-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 2715–2727, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2715-2020

Brief communication 27 Aug 2020

Brief communication | 27 Aug 2020

Brief communication: Evaluating Antarctic precipitation in ERA5 and CMIP6 against CloudSat observations

Marie-Laure Roussel et al.

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Cited articles

Boening, C., Lebsock, M., Landerer, F., and Stephens, G.: Snowfall-driven mass change on the East Antarctic ice sheet, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L21501, https://doi.org/10.1029/2012GL053316, 2012. a
Cinquini, L., Crichton, D., Mattmann, C., Harney, J., Shipman, G., Wang, F., Ananthakrishnan, R., Miller, N., Denvil, S., Morgan, M., Pobre, Z., Bell, G. M., Doutriaux, C., Drach, R., Williams, D., Kershaw, P., Pascoe, S., Gonzalez, E., Fiore, S., and Schweitzer, R.: The Earth System Grid Federation: An open infrastructure for access to distributed geospatial data, Future Generation Computer Systems, 36, 400–417, doi10.1016/j.future.2013.07.002, 2014. a
Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S): ERA5: Fifth generation of ECMWF atmospheric reanalyses of the global climate, dataset available at https://cds.climate.copernicus.eu/cdsapp (9 December 2019), 2017. a, b
Di Luca, A., de Elía, R., and Laprise, R.: Potential for added value in precipitation simulated by high-resolution nested regional climate models and observations, Clim. Dynam., 38, 1229–1247, 2012. a
Eyring, V., Bony, S., Meehl, G. A., Senior, C. A., Stevens, B., Stouffer, R. J., and Taylor, K. E.: Overview of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) experimental design and organization, Geosci. Model Dev., 9, 1937–1958, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-1937-2016, 2016. a, b
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Short summary
The Antarctic precipitation is evaluated against space radar data in the most recent climate model intercomparison CMIP6 and reanalysis ERA5. The seasonal cycle is mostly well reproduced, but relative errors are higher in areas of complex topography, particularly in the higher-resolution models. At continental and regional scales all results are biased high, with no significant progress in the more recent models. Predicting Antarctic contribution to sea level still requires model improvements.