Articles | Volume 8, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 8, 2089–2100, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-8-2089-2014
The Cryosphere, 8, 2089–2100, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-8-2089-2014

Research article 20 Nov 2014

Research article | 20 Nov 2014

Snowmelt onset over Arctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite data: 1979–2012

A. C. Bliss and M. R. Anderson

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Cited articles

Abdalati, W., Steffen, K., Otto, C., and Jezek, K. C.: Comparison of Brightness Temperatures from SSMI Instruments on the DMSP F8 and F11 Satellites for Antarctica and the Greenland Ice Sheet, Int. J. Remote Sens., 16, 7, 1223–1229, https://doi.org/10.1080/01431169508954473, 1995.
Anderson, M. R. and Drobot, S. D.: Spatial and temporal variability in snowmelt onset over Arctic sea ice, Ann. Glaciol., 33, 74–78, 2001.
Anderson, M. R., Bliss, A. C., and Drobot, S. D.: Snow melt onset over Arctic sea ice from SMMR and SSM/I-SSMIS brightness temperatures, Version 3, 1979–2012, NASA DAAC at 15 the National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, Colorado, USA, available at: http://nsidc.org/data/nsidc-0105.html, last access: 2 June 2014.
Belchansky, G. I., Douglas, D. C., and Platonov, N. G.: Duration of the Arctic sea ice melt season: regional and interannual variability 1979–2001, J. Climate, 17, 67–80, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0442(2004)017<0067:DOTASI>2.0.CO;2, 2004.
Cavalieri, D. J. and Parkinson, C. L.: Arctic sea ice variability and trends, 1979–2010, The Cryosphere, 6, 881–889, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-6-881-2012, 2012.
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Short summary
A new version of the Snow Melt Onset Over Arctic Sea Ice from SMMR and SSM/I-SSMIS Brightness Temperatures is now available. From this data set, a statistical summary of melt onset (MO) dates on Arctic sea ice is presented. Significant trends indicate that MO is occurring 6.6days/decade earlier in the year for the Arctic while regional trends in MO are as great as 11.8days/decade earlier in the East Siberian Sea. The Bering Sea is an outlier where MO is occurring 3.1days/decade later.