Articles | Volume 15, issue 10
The Cryosphere, 15, 4975–4980, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-4975-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 4975–4980, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-4975-2021

Brief communication 26 Oct 2021

Brief communication | 26 Oct 2021

Brief communication: Evaluation of the snow cover detection in the Copernicus High Resolution Snow & Ice Monitoring Service

Zacharie Barrou Dumont et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-172', Anonymous Referee #1, 08 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Simon Gascoin, 09 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Review comment on tc-2021-172', Anonymous Referee #2, 13 Jul 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Simon Gascoin, 09 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Sep 2021) by Masashi Niwano
AR by Simon Gascoin on behalf of the Authors (22 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (30 Sep 2021) by Masashi Niwano
Download
Short summary
Since 2020, the Copernicus High Resolution Snow & Ice Monitoring Service has distributed snow cover maps at 20 m resolution over Europe in near-real time. These products are derived from the Sentinel-2 Earth observation mission, with a revisit time of 5 d or less (cloud-permitting). Here we show the good accuracy of the snow detection over a wide range of regions in Europe, except in dense forest regions where the snow cover is hidden by the trees.