Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
The Cryosphere, 14, 4165–4180, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4165-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 4165–4180, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4165-2020

Research article 24 Nov 2020

Research article | 24 Nov 2020

The influence of föhn winds on annual and seasonal surface melt on the Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Jenny V. Turton et al.

Related authors

The distribution and evolution of supraglacial lakes on 79° N Glacier (north-eastern Greenland) and interannual climatic controls
Jenny V. Turton, Philipp Hochreuther, Nathalie Reimann, and Manuel T. Blau
The Cryosphere, 15, 3877–3896, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3877-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3877-2021, 2021
Short summary
High-resolution (1 km) Polar WRF output for 79° N Glacier and the northeast of Greenland from 2014 to 2018
Jenny V. Turton, Thomas Mölg, and Emily Collier
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 12, 1191–1202, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-12-1191-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-12-1191-2020, 2020
Short summary

Cited articles

Bell, R. E., Banwell, A. F., Trusel, L. D., and Kingslake, J.: Antarctic surface hydrology and impacts on ice-sheet mass balance, Nat. Clim. Change, 8, 1044–1052, 2018. 
Bevan, S. L., Luckman, A. J., Kuipers Munneke, P., Hubbard, B., Kulessa, B., and Ashmore, D. W.: Decline in surface melt duration over Larsen C ice shelf revealed by the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT), Earth Space Sci., 5, 578–591, 2018. 
Brandt, R. E. and Warren, S. G.: Solar-heating rates and temperature profiles in Antarctic snow and ice, J. Glaciol., 39, 99–110, 1993. 
Cape, M. R., Vernet, M., Skvarca, P., Marinsek, S., Scambos, T., and Domack, E.: Foehn winds link climate-driven warming to ice shelf evolution in Antarctica, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 120, 11037–11057, 2015. 
Download
Short summary
Föhn winds are warm and dry downslope winds in the lee of a mountain range, such as the Antarctic Peninsula. Föhn winds heat the ice of the Larsen C Ice Shelf at the base of the mountains and promote more melting than during non-föhn periods in spring, summer and autumn in both model output and observations. Especially in spring, when they are most frequent, föhn winds can extend the melt season by over a month and cause a similar magnitude of melting to that observed in summer.