Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
The Cryosphere, 14, 3829–3842, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3829-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 3829–3842, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3829-2020

Research article 09 Nov 2020

Research article | 09 Nov 2020

Sub-permafrost methane seepage from open-system pingos in Svalbard

Andrew J. Hodson et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Methane stored below permafrost is an unknown quantity in the Arctic greenhouse gas budget. In coastal areas with rising sea levels, much of the methane seeps into the sea and is removed before it reaches the atmosphere. However, where land uplift outpaces rising sea levels, the former seabed freezes, pressurising methane-rich groundwater beneath, which then escapes via permafrost seepages called pingos. We describe this mechanism and the origins of the methane discharging from Svalbard pingos.