Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
The Cryosphere, 14, 3829–3842, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3829-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 3829–3842, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3829-2020

Research article 09 Nov 2020

Research article | 09 Nov 2020

Sub-permafrost methane seepage from open-system pingos in Svalbard

Andrew J. Hodson et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (20 May 2020) by Peter Morse
AR by Andy Hodson on behalf of the Authors (09 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Jul 2020) by Peter Morse
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (05 Aug 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (08 Sep 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (09 Sep 2020) by Peter Morse
AR by Andy Hodson on behalf of the Authors (17 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (24 Sep 2020) by Peter Morse
Short summary
Methane stored below permafrost is an unknown quantity in the Arctic greenhouse gas budget. In coastal areas with rising sea levels, much of the methane seeps into the sea and is removed before it reaches the atmosphere. However, where land uplift outpaces rising sea levels, the former seabed freezes, pressurising methane-rich groundwater beneath, which then escapes via permafrost seepages called pingos. We describe this mechanism and the origins of the methane discharging from Svalbard pingos.