Articles | Volume 12, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 12, 907–920, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-907-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 907–920, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-907-2018

Research article 14 Mar 2018

Research article | 14 Mar 2018

Near-surface temperature inversion during summer at Summit, Greenland, and its relation to MODIS-derived surface temperatures

Alden C. Adolph et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Alden Adolph on behalf of the Authors (16 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Jan 2018) by Michiel van den Broeke
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (22 Jan 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (30 Jan 2018)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (30 Jan 2018) by Michiel van den Broeke
AR by Alden Adolph on behalf of the Authors (06 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
In our studies of surface temperature in Greenland, we found that there can be differences between the temperature of the snow surface and the air directly above, depending on wind speed and incoming solar radiation. We also found that temperature measurements of the snow surface from remote sensing instruments may be more accurate than previously thought. Our results are relevant to studies of climate change in the remote sensing community and in studies of the atmospheric boundary layer.