Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 16, 1349–1367, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1349-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 1349–1367, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1349-2022
Research article
12 Apr 2022
Research article | 12 Apr 2022

Mass evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula over the last 2 decades from a joint Bayesian inversion

Stephen J. Chuter et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-178', Anonymous Referee #1, 02 Sep 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Stephen Chuter, 20 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-178', Anonymous Referee #2, 25 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Nov 2021) by Stef Lhermitte
AR by Stephen Chuter on behalf of the Authors (02 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Dec 2021) by Stef Lhermitte
AR by Stephen Chuter on behalf of the Authors (23 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We find the Antarctic Peninsula to have a mean mass loss of 19 ± 1.1 Gt yr−1 over the 2003–2019 period, driven predominantly by changes in ice dynamic flow like due to changes in ocean forcing. This long-term record is crucial to ascertaining the region’s present-day contribution to sea level rise, with the understanding of driving processes enabling better future predictions. Our statistical approach enables us to estimate this previously poorly surveyed regions mass balance more accurately.