Articles | Volume 15, issue 9
The Cryosphere, 15, 4315–4333, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-4315-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 4315–4333, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-4315-2021

Research article 08 Sep 2021

Research article | 08 Sep 2021

Downscaled surface mass balance in Antarctica: impacts of subsurface processes and large-scale atmospheric circulation

Nicolaj Hansen et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-69', Anonymous Referee #1, 05 May 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Nicolaj Hansen, 11 Jun 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-69', Christoph Kittel, 06 May 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Nicolaj Hansen, 11 Jun 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (19 Jun 2021) by Alexander Robinson
AR by Nicolaj Hansen on behalf of the Authors (23 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (19 Jul 2021) by Alexander Robinson
AR by Nicolaj Hansen on behalf of the Authors (28 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Aug 2021) by Alexander Robinson
AR by Nicolaj Hansen on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 Aug 2021) by Alexander Robinson
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Short summary
We have used computer models to estimate the Antarctic surface mass balance (SMB) from 1980 to 2017. Our estimates lies between 2473.5 ± 114.4 Gt per year and 2564.8 ± 113.7 Gt per year. To evaluate our models, we compared the modelled snow temperatures and densities to in situ measurements. We also investigated the spatial distribution of the SMB. It is very important to have estimates of the Antarctic SMB because then it is easier to understand global sea level changes.