Articles | Volume 15, issue 8
The Cryosphere, 15, 3839–3860, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3839-2021

Special issue: Oldest Ice: finding and interpreting climate proxies in ice...

The Cryosphere, 15, 3839–3860, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3839-2021

Research article 18 Aug 2021

Research article | 18 Aug 2021

Investigating the internal structure of the Antarctic ice sheet: the utility of isochrones for spatiotemporal ice-sheet model calibration

Johannes Sutter et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (25 Mar 2021) by Pippa Whitehouse
AR by Johannes Sutter on behalf of the Authors (30 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (04 May 2021) by Pippa Whitehouse
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (10 May 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 May 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Jun 2021) by Pippa Whitehouse
AR by Johannes Sutter on behalf of the Authors (13 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Jun 2021) by Pippa Whitehouse
AR by Johannes Sutter on behalf of the Authors (24 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (03 Jul 2021) by Pippa Whitehouse
AR by Johannes Sutter on behalf of the Authors (11 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Projections of global sea-level changes in a warming world require ice-sheet models. We expand the calibration of these models by making use of the internal architecture of the Antarctic ice sheet, which is formed by its evolution over many millennia. We propose that using our novel approach to constrain ice sheet models, we will be able to both sharpen our understanding of past and future sea-level changes and identify weaknesses in the parameterisation of current continental-scale models.