Articles | Volume 15, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 15, 265–282, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-265-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 265–282, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-265-2021

Research article 19 Jan 2021

Research article | 19 Jan 2021

Debris cover and the thinning of Kennicott Glacier, Alaska: in situ measurements, automated ice cliff delineation and distributed melt estimates

Leif S. Anderson et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (26 Apr 2020) by Francesca Pellicciotti
AR by Leif Anderson on behalf of the Authors (31 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 Aug 2020) by Francesca Pellicciotti
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (02 Sep 2020)
RR by Evan Miles (08 Sep 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Sep 2020) by Francesca Pellicciotti
AR by Leif Anderson on behalf of the Authors (22 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (16 Nov 2020) by Francesca Pellicciotti
AR by Leif Anderson on behalf of the Authors (17 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Leif Anderson on behalf of the Authors (11 Jan 2021)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (13 Jan 2021) by Francesca Pellicciotti
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Short summary
Many glaciers are thinning rapidly beneath debris cover (loose rock) that reduces melt, including Kennicott Glacier in Alaska. This contradiction has been explained by melt hotspots, such as ice cliffs, scattered within the debris cover. However, at Kennicott Glacier declining ice flow explains the rapid thinning. Through this study, Kennicott Glacier is now the first glacier in Alaska, and the largest glacier globally, where melt across its debris-covered tongue has been rigorously quantified.