Articles | Volume 15, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2041-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2041-2021
Research article
 | 
23 Apr 2021
Research article |  | 23 Apr 2021

Top-of-permafrost ground ice indicated by remotely sensed late-season subsidence

Simon Zwieback and Franz J. Meyer

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 Feb 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Simon Zwieback on behalf of the Authors (08 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Feb 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Simon Zwieback on behalf of the Authors (05 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Mar 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Simon Zwieback on behalf of the Authors (22 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (23 Mar 2021) by Peter Morse
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Short summary
Thawing of ice-rich permafrost leads to subsidence and slumping, which can compromise Arctic infrastructure. However, we lack fine-scale maps of permafrost ground ice, chiefly because it is usually invisible at the surface. We show that subsidence at the end of summer serves as a fingerprint with which near-surface permafrost ground ice can be identified. As this can be done with satellite data, this method may help improve ground ice maps and thus sustainably steward the Arctic.