Articles | Volume 15, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 15, 1501–1516, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1501-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 1501–1516, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1501-2021

Research article 25 Mar 2021

Research article | 25 Mar 2021

The tipping points and early warning indicators for Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica

Sebastian H. R. Rosier et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (29 Oct 2020) by Pippa Whitehouse
AR by Sebastian Rosier on behalf of the Authors (30 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (16 Dec 2020) by Pippa Whitehouse
RR by Alexander Robel (29 Dec 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (04 Jan 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Jan 2021) by Pippa Whitehouse
AR by Sebastian Rosier on behalf of the Authors (21 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (31 Jan 2021) by Pippa Whitehouse
AR by Sebastian Rosier on behalf of the Authors (08 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Pine Island Glacier has contributed more to sea-level rise over the past decades than any other glacier in Antarctica. Ice-flow modelling studies have shown that it can undergo periods of rapid mass loss, but no study has shown that these future changes could cross a tipping point and therefore be effectively irreversible. Here, we assess the stability of Pine Island Glacier, quantifying the changes in ocean temperatures required to cross future tipping points using statistical methods.