Articles | Volume 15, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 15, 1343–1382, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1343-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 1343–1382, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1343-2021

Research article 18 Mar 2021

Research article | 18 Mar 2021

Observed snow depth trends in the European Alps: 1971 to 2019

Michael Matiu et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (17 Dec 2020) by Guillaume Chambon
AR by Michael Matiu on behalf of the Authors (23 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Jan 2021) by Guillaume Chambon
RR by Ross Brown (05 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 Jan 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (20 Jan 2021) by Guillaume Chambon
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (01 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (01 Feb 2021) by Guillaume Chambon

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Michael Matiu on behalf of the Authors (05 Mar 2021)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (09 Mar 2021) by Guillaume Chambon
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Short summary
The first Alpine-wide assessment of station snow depth has been enabled by a collaborative effort of the research community which involves more than 30 partners, 6 countries, and more than 2000 stations. It shows how snow in the European Alps matches the climatic zones and gives a robust estimate of observed changes: stronger decreases in the snow season at low elevations and in spring at all elevations, however, with considerable regional differences.