Articles | Volume 14, issue 12
The Cryosphere, 14, 4341–4364, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4341-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 4341–4364, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4341-2020

Research article 02 Dec 2020

Research article | 02 Dec 2020

Ground ice, organic carbon and soluble cations in tundra permafrost soils and sediments near a Laurentide ice divide in the Slave Geological Province, Northwest Territories, Canada

Rupesh Subedi et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (09 Jul 2020) by Christian Hauck
AR by Stephan Gruber on behalf of the Authors (11 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Jul 2020) by Christian Hauck
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (10 Aug 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Sep 2020) by Christian Hauck
AR by Stephan Gruber on behalf of the Authors (06 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (26 Oct 2020) by Christian Hauck
Download
Short summary
Permafrost beneath tundra near Lac de Gras (Northwest Territories, Canada) contains more ice and less organic carbon than shown in global compilations. Excess-ice content of 20–60 %, likely remnant Laurentide basal ice, is found in upland till. This study is based on 24 boreholes up to 10 m deep. Findings highlight geology and glacial legacy as determinants of a mosaic of permafrost characteristics with potential for thaw subsidence up to several metres in some locations.