Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
The Cryosphere, 14, 4253–4263, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4253-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 4253–4263, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4253-2020

Research article 27 Nov 2020

Research article | 27 Nov 2020

Using ICESat-2 and Operation IceBridge altimetry for supraglacial lake depth retrievals

Zachary Fair et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (22 Aug 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
AR by Zachary Fair on behalf of the Authors (28 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (19 Sep 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (03 Oct 2020)
ED: Publish as is (19 Oct 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
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Short summary
Ice on glaciers and ice sheets may melt and pond on ice surfaces in summer months. Detection and observation of these meltwater ponds is important for understanding glaciers and ice sheets, and satellite imagery has been used in previous work. However, image-based methods struggle with deep water, so we used data from the Ice, Clouds, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) and the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) to demonstrate the potential for lidar depth monitoring.