Articles | Volume 16, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 16, 435–450, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-435-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 435–450, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-435-2022
Research article
04 Feb 2022
Research article | 04 Feb 2022

Relating snowfall observations to Greenland ice sheet mass changes: an atmospheric circulation perspective

Michael R. Gallagher et al.

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Short summary
By using direct observations of snowfall and mass changes, the variability of daily snowfall mass input to the Greenland ice sheet is quantified for the first time. With new methods we conclude that cyclones west of Greenland in summer contribute the most snowfall, with 1.66 Gt per occurrence. These cyclones are contextualized in the broader Greenland climate, and snowfall is validated against mass changes to verify the results. Snowfall and mass change observations are shown to agree well.