Articles | Volume 16, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 16, 435–450, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-435-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 435–450, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-435-2022

Research article 04 Feb 2022

Research article | 04 Feb 2022

Relating snowfall observations to Greenland ice sheet mass changes: an atmospheric circulation perspective

Michael R. Gallagher et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-150', Anonymous Referee #1, 02 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Michael Gallagher, 15 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-150', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Jul 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Michael Gallagher, 15 Sep 2021
  • AC3: 'Comment on tc-2021-150', Michael Gallagher, 15 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (14 Oct 2021) by Ruth Mottram
AR by Michael Gallagher on behalf of the Authors (15 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (30 Oct 2021) by Ruth Mottram
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Short summary
By using direct observations of snowfall and mass changes, the variability of daily snowfall mass input to the Greenland ice sheet is quantified for the first time. With new methods we conclude that cyclones west of Greenland in summer contribute the most snowfall, with 1.66 Gt per occurrence. These cyclones are contextualized in the broader Greenland climate, and snowfall is validated against mass changes to verify the results. Snowfall and mass change observations are shown to agree well.