Articles | Volume 16, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 16, 2505–2526, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2505-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 2505–2526, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2505-2022
Research article
24 Jun 2022
Research article | 24 Jun 2022

Three different glacier surges at a spot: what satellites observe and what not

Frank Paul et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-370', Anonymous Referee #1, 31 Jan 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Frank Paul, 02 Apr 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-370', Anonymous Referee #2, 07 Feb 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Frank Paul, 02 Apr 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (10 Apr 2022) by Christian Haas
AR by Frank Paul on behalf of the Authors (25 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 May 2022) by Christian Haas

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Frank Paul on behalf of the Authors (20 Jun 2022)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (22 Jun 2022) by Christian Haas
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Short summary
Glacier surges are widespread in the Karakoram and have been intensely studied using satellite data and DEMs. We use time series of such datasets to study three glacier surges in the same region of the Karakoram. We found strongly contrasting advance rates and flow velocities, maximum velocities of 30 m d−1, and a change in the surge mechanism during a surge. A sensor comparison revealed good agreement, but steep terrain and the two smaller glaciers caused limitations for some of them.