Articles | Volume 16, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 16, 1889–1901, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1889-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 1889–1901, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1889-2022
Research article
19 May 2022
Research article | 19 May 2022

High nitrate variability on an Alaskan permafrost hillslope dominated by alder shrubs

Rachael E. McCaully et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (29 Sep 2021) by Ylva Sjöberg
AR by Carli Arendt on behalf of the Authors (08 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Nov 2021) by Ylva Sjöberg
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (11 Dec 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Dec 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (18 Jan 2022)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (01 Mar 2022) by Ylva Sjöberg
AR by Carli Arendt on behalf of the Authors (19 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 May 2022) by Ylva Sjöberg
AR by Carli Arendt on behalf of the Authors (03 May 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 May 2022) by Ylva Sjöberg
AR by Carli Arendt on behalf of the Authors (03 May 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Degrading permafrost and shrub expansion are critically important to tundra biogeochemistry. We observed significant variability in soil pore water NO3-N in an alder-dominated permafrost hillslope in Alaska. Proximity to alder shrubs and the presence or absence of topographic gradients and precipitation events strongly influence NO3-N availability and mobility. The highly dynamic nature of labile N on small spatiotemporal scales has implications for nutrient responses to a warming Arctic.