Articles | Volume 16, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 16, 1889–1901, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1889-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 1889–1901, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1889-2022
Research article
19 May 2022
Research article | 19 May 2022

High nitrate variability on an Alaskan permafrost hillslope dominated by alder shrubs

Rachael E. McCaully et al.

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Latest update: 04 Dec 2022
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Short summary
Degrading permafrost and shrub expansion are critically important to tundra biogeochemistry. We observed significant variability in soil pore water NO3-N in an alder-dominated permafrost hillslope in Alaska. Proximity to alder shrubs and the presence or absence of topographic gradients and precipitation events strongly influence NO3-N availability and mobility. The highly dynamic nature of labile N on small spatiotemporal scales has implications for nutrient responses to a warming Arctic.