Articles | Volume 16, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1765-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1765-2022
Research article
 | 
06 May 2022
Research article |  | 06 May 2022

Divergence of apparent and intrinsic snow albedo over a season at a sub-alpine site with implications for remote sensing

Edward H. Bair, Jeff Dozier, Charles Stern, Adam LeWinter, Karl Rittger, Alexandria Savagian, Timbo Stillinger, and Robert E. Davis

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Latest update: 11 Apr 2024
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Short summary
Understanding how snow and ice reflect solar radiation (albedo) is important for global climate. Using high-resolution topography, darkening from surface roughness (apparent albedo) is separated from darkening by the composition of the snow (intrinsic albedo). Intrinsic albedo is usually greater than apparent albedo, especially during melt. Such high-resolution topography is often not available; thus the use of a shade component when modeling mixtures is advised.