Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 16, 1383–1397, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1383-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 1383–1397, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1383-2022
Research article
20 Apr 2022
Research article | 20 Apr 2022

Land–atmosphere interactions in sub-polar and alpine climates in the CORDEX Flagship Pilot Study Land Use and Climate Across Scales (LUCAS) models – Part 2: The role of changing vegetation

Priscilla A. Mooney et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-291', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Priscilla Mooney, 04 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-291', Anonymous Referee #2, 24 Dec 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Priscilla Mooney, 04 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (09 Feb 2022) by Ruth Mottram
AR by Priscilla Mooney on behalf of the Authors (16 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Mar 2022) by Ruth Mottram
AR by Priscilla Mooney on behalf of the Authors (13 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
Short summary
We use multiple regional climate models to show that afforestation in sub-polar and alpine regions reduces the radiative impact of snow albedo on the atmosphere, reduces snow cover, and delays the start of the snowmelt season. This is important for local communities that are highly reliant on snowpack for water resources and winter tourism. However, models disagree on the amount of change particularly when snow is melting. This shows that more research is needed on snow–vegetation interactions.