Articles | Volume 15, issue 12
The Cryosphere, 15, 5371–5386, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5371-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 5371–5386, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5371-2021

Research article 06 Dec 2021

Research article | 06 Dec 2021

Multilayer observation and estimation of the snowpack cold content in a humid boreal coniferous forest of eastern Canada

Achut Parajuli et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-98', Anonymous Referee #1, 04 May 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-98', Keith Jennings, 11 May 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (16 Jul 2021) by Carrie Vuyovich
AR by Achut Parajuli on behalf of the Authors (20 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Sep 2021) by Carrie Vuyovich
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Sep 2021)
RR by Keith Jennings (04 Oct 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (05 Oct 2021) by Carrie Vuyovich
AR by Achut Parajuli on behalf of the Authors (21 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (07 Nov 2021) by Carrie Vuyovich
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Short summary
Cold content is the energy required to attain an isothermal (0 °C) state and resulting in the snow surface melt. This study focuses on determining the multi-layer cold content (30 min time steps) relying on field measurements, snow temperature profile, and empirical formulation in four distinct forest sites of Montmorency Forest, eastern Canada. We present novel research where the effect of forest structure, local topography, and meteorological conditions on cold content variability is explored.