Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 15, 2251–2254, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2251-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 2251–2254, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2251-2021
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17 May 2021
Comment/reply  | Highlight paper | 17 May 2021

Comment on “Exceptionally high heat flux needed to sustain the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream” by Smith-Johnsen et al. (2020)

Paul D. Bons et al.

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Short summary
The modelling of Smith-Johnson et al. (The Cryosphere, 14, 841–854, 2020) suggests that a very large heat flux of more than 10 times the usual geothermal heat flux is required to have initiated or to control the huge Northeast Greenland Ice Stream. Our comparison with known hotspots, such as Iceland and Yellowstone, shows that such an exceptional heat flux would be unique in the world and is incompatible with known geological processes that can raise the heat flux.