Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 15, 2251–2254, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2251-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 2251–2254, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2251-2021

Comment/reply 17 May 2021

Comment/reply | 17 May 2021

Comment on “Exceptionally high heat flux needed to sustain the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream” by Smith-Johnsen et al. (2020)

Paul D. Bons et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Mar 2021) by Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson
AR by Paul D. Bons on behalf of the Authors (18 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Apr 2021) by Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson
AR by Paul D. Bons on behalf of the Authors (10 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
Short summary
The modelling of Smith-Johnson et al. (The Cryosphere, 14, 841–854, 2020) suggests that a very large heat flux of more than 10 times the usual geothermal heat flux is required to have initiated or to control the huge Northeast Greenland Ice Stream. Our comparison with known hotspots, such as Iceland and Yellowstone, shows that such an exceptional heat flux would be unique in the world and is incompatible with known geological processes that can raise the heat flux.