Articles | Volume 15, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 15, 133–148, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-133-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 133–148, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-133-2021

Research article 13 Jan 2021

Research article | 13 Jan 2021

Spectral characterization, radiative forcing and pigment content of coastal Antarctic snow algae: approaches to spectrally discriminate red and green communities and their impact on snowmelt

Alia L. Khan et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (15 Oct 2020) by Christian Haas
AR by Alia Khan on behalf of the Authors (15 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (16 Oct 2020) by Christian Haas
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (05 Nov 2020)
ED: Publish as is (13 Nov 2020) by Christian Haas
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Short summary
We present radiative forcing (RF) estimates by snow algae in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) region from multi-year measurements of solar radiation and ground-based hyperspectral characterization of red and green snow algae collected during a brief field expedition in austral summer 2018. Mean daily RF was double for green (~26 W m−2) vs. red (~13 W m−2) snow algae during the peak growing season, which is on par with midlatitude dust attributions capable of advancing snowmelt.