Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3875-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3875-2020
Research article
 | 
10 Nov 2020
Research article |  | 10 Nov 2020

Temperature and strain controls on ice deformation mechanisms: insights from the microstructures of samples deformed to progressively higher strains at −10, −20 and −30 °C

Sheng Fan, Travis F. Hager, David J. Prior, Andrew J. Cross, David L. Goldsby, Chao Qi, Marianne Negrini, and John Wheeler

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Latest update: 25 Feb 2024
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Short summary
We performed uniaxial compression experiments on synthetic ice samples. We report ice microstructural evolution at –20 and –30 °C that has never been reported before. Microstructural data show the opening angle of c-axis cones decreases with increasing strain or with decreasing temperature, suggesting a more active grain rotation. CPO intensity weakens with temperature because CPO of small grains is weaker, and it can be explained by grain boundary sliding or nucleation with random orientations.