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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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The Antarctic ice sheet is the largest source for sea level rise. However, one key control on ice sheet flow remains poorly constrained: the effect of heat from the rocks beneath the ice sheet (known as geothermal heat flow). Although this may not seem like a lot of heat, beneath thick, slow ice this heat can control how well the ice flows and can lead to melting of the ice sheet. We discuss the methods used to estimate this heat, compile existing data, and recommend future research.
TC | Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
The Cryosphere, 14, 3843–3873, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3843-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 3843–3873, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3843-2020

Review article 10 Nov 2020

Review article | 10 Nov 2020

Review article: Geothermal heat flow in Antarctica: current and future directions

Alex Burton-Johnson et al.

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Latest update: 17 Jan 2021
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
The Antarctic ice sheet is the largest source for sea level rise. However, one key control on ice sheet flow remains poorly constrained: the effect of heat from the rocks beneath the ice sheet (known as geothermal heat flow). Although this may not seem like a lot of heat, beneath thick, slow ice this heat can control how well the ice flows and can lead to melting of the ice sheet. We discuss the methods used to estimate this heat, compile existing data, and recommend future research.
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