Articles | Volume 14, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 14, 1–16, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 1–16, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1-2020

Research article 02 Jan 2020

Research article | 02 Jan 2020

Rock glacier characteristics serve as an indirect record of multiple alpine glacier advances in Taylor Valley, Antarctica

Kelsey Winsor et al.

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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Sep 2019) by Peter Morse
AR by Kate Swanger on behalf of the Authors (01 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (24 Oct 2019) by Peter Morse
AR by Kate Swanger on behalf of the Authors (02 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Nov 2019) by Peter Morse
AR by Kate Swanger on behalf of the Authors (11 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We studied an ice-cored rock glacier in Taylor Valley, Antarctica, coupling ground-penetrating radar analyses with stable isotope and major ion geochemistry of (a) surface ponds and (b) buried clean ice. These analyses indicate that the rock glacier ice is fed by a nearby alpine glacier, recording multiple Holocene to late Pleistocene glacial advances. We demonstrate the potential to use rock glaciers and buried ice, common throughout Antarctica, to map previous glacial extents.