Articles | Volume 14, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 14, 1–16, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 1–16, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1-2020

Research article 02 Jan 2020

Research article | 02 Jan 2020

Rock glacier characteristics serve as an indirect record of multiple alpine glacier advances in Taylor Valley, Antarctica

Kelsey Winsor et al.

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Short summary
We studied an ice-cored rock glacier in Taylor Valley, Antarctica, coupling ground-penetrating radar analyses with stable isotope and major ion geochemistry of (a) surface ponds and (b) buried clean ice. These analyses indicate that the rock glacier ice is fed by a nearby alpine glacier, recording multiple Holocene to late Pleistocene glacial advances. We demonstrate the potential to use rock glaciers and buried ice, common throughout Antarctica, to map previous glacial extents.