Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 12, 657–673, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-657-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 657–673, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-657-2018

Research article 23 Feb 2018

Research article | 23 Feb 2018

Change in frozen soils and its effect on regional hydrology, upper Heihe basin, northeastern Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau

Bing Gao et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Bing Gao on behalf of the Authors (03 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (13 Nov 2017) by Peter Morse
AR by Bing Gao on behalf of the Authors (22 Dec 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (07 Jan 2018) by Peter Morse
AR by Bing Gao on behalf of the Authors (11 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (17 Jan 2018) by Peter Morse
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Short summary
This study developed a distributed hydrological model coupled with cryospherical processes and applied it in order to simulate the long-term change of frozen ground and its effect on hydrology in the upper Heihe basin. Results showed that the permafrost area shrank by 8.8%, and the frozen depth of seasonally frozen ground decreased. Runoff in cold seasons and annual liquid soil moisture increased due to frozen soils change. Groundwater recharge was enhanced due to the degradation of permafrost.