Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 12, 657–673, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-657-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 657–673, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-657-2018
Research article
23 Feb 2018
Research article | 23 Feb 2018

Change in frozen soils and its effect on regional hydrology, upper Heihe basin, northeastern Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau

Bing Gao et al.

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Short summary
This study developed a distributed hydrological model coupled with cryospherical processes and applied it in order to simulate the long-term change of frozen ground and its effect on hydrology in the upper Heihe basin. Results showed that the permafrost area shrank by 8.8%, and the frozen depth of seasonally frozen ground decreased. Runoff in cold seasons and annual liquid soil moisture increased due to frozen soils change. Groundwater recharge was enhanced due to the degradation of permafrost.