Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 12, 521–547, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-521-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 521–547, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-521-2018

Research article 13 Feb 2018

Research article | 13 Feb 2018

Increased West Antarctic and unchanged East Antarctic ice discharge over the last 7 years

Alex S. Gardner et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Alex Gardner on behalf of the Authors (30 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Nov 2017) by G. Hilmar Gudmundsson
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (06 Nov 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (10 Nov 2017) by G. Hilmar Gudmundsson
AR by Alex Gardner on behalf of the Authors (21 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (27 Nov 2017) by G. Hilmar Gudmundsson

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Alex Gardner on behalf of the Authors (15 Jan 2018)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (06 Feb 2018) by G. Hilmar Gudmundsson
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Short summary
We map present-day Antarctic surface velocities from Landsat imagery and compare to earlier estimates from radar. Flow accelerations across the grounding lines of West Antarctica's Amundsen Sea Embayment, Getz Ice Shelf and the western Antarctic Peninsula, account for 89 % of the observed increase in ice discharge. In contrast, glaciers draining the East Antarctic have been remarkably stable. Our work suggests that patterns of mass loss are part of a longer-term phase of enhanced flow.